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Latest Climbing questions

Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Nov 4th 2015
Hi Camella, The easiest way to tell is to compare the size of the lobes on either side of the axle. If they are different then you are holding an offset. Some companies also use different colours on the lobes to help you differentiate, and the BlackDiamond offsets even have multi-coloured slings that let you differentiate your offsets even when they are dangling from your harness! Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Nov 4th 2015
Hi Laurelle, There are a few differences in the designs, chief among them are that double axle designs have a greater expansion range but they are usually a little heavier too. The trigger action of both design of cam is also slightly different. If you are thinking to buy your first set of cams but are unsure which type to get, maybe you can borrow each type from your friends to find out which you prefer Another interesting feature of some twin-axle cams is that they can, in theory, be placed passively.... (more)

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Nov 4th 2015
Hi Shayne, The Freino carabiner will help to increase the friction through the belay device, but it is no substitute for a prusik. It is possible to rappel without using a prusik, however, it is much, much safer to use one. There are also many situations where you may need a spare hand while abseiling, like stripping quickdraws from a sport route or building the next rappel anchor on a multi-pitch decent. In these cases especially, it is highly recommended that you use a prusik. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Nov 4th 2015
Hi Silas, I'm really sorry to have to be the one to break this to you, but you can't; Sylvester's bolt gun isn't real. The minute that someone makes the bolt gun a reality though, you can be sure that the EpicTV shop will be stocking them! Hope that helps and commiserations, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Nov 4th 2015
Hi Stefanu, The quick answer is that it goes at around Scottish grade II/III. It has also been rated as a class 4 route using the YDS. However, although this grade seems very easy, climbing it at 8700m would make it feel unimaginably harder. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Oct 20th 2015
Hi Chas! We're not really sure what you mean, sorry. Gear Geek is a public forum where anyone can post questions and answer them, not just us here at epicTV. Could you possibly clarify what you mean so that we might be of more help? Thanks, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Oct 15th 2015
Hi Camella, This will depend entirely on what routes you are planning to do. Try looking in the guide book at the technical grade of your route. If it is a mixed or water Ice grade you will almost certainly be climbing the route in your mountaineering boots. If it is a technical climbing grade however, then you should take rock shoes unless the grade is significantly below your climbing level. Because Alpine routes are usually quite long, you should take a more comfortable pair of rock boots that you can wear all day but be aware that this may effect your climbing level.... (more)

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Oct 15th 2015
Hi Alistair, This is a great question. One of the easiest and most common ways to learn these techniques is from a competent friend. However, if you want proper instruction, then there are plenty of centres around the UK that will teach you, such as Plas Y Brenin in Wales or Glenmore Lodge in Scotland. For Alpine climbing, a great learning experience would be to hire a mountain guide for a few days climbing in the Alps.... (more)

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