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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 31st 2015
Hi Oziel, Climbing brushes are usually much more hardy than your average tooth brush. While some companies still use plastic bristles, the majority use hog or boar hair which is supposedly better for removing chalk from climbing holds. The handles are much stronger also, allowing you to really put the pressure down while scrubbing. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 31st 2015
Hi Rodney, I think if you are just out climbing for a day, then a ping pong sized lump of chalk should be enough. If you overfill you bag then you may end up with more chalk on your hands than you need which is not only wasteful but also not much help when climbing. Everyone will differ in how much their hands will swear and temperatures and rock types will also effect the amount of chalk you use. You should try experimenting to find out what works best for you. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 31st 2015
Hi Laurelle, It's as normal as climbing on rock for fun! On shorter problems you may prefer to leave the chalk on the floor, but for any longer routes where you might want to chalk up mid route, then attaching it to your waste is a good plan. If your project is low enough to the ground, you might be able t persuade a helpful spotter to hold your chalk bag up to you while you cling on to the rock. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 31st 2015
Hi Hasse, This is unfortunately one question you will have to answer yourself. If you have barely used your rope and stored it in a dry environment then your rope will probably still be safe to use. If you have been using it every day for the last three years then perhaps less so. Some rope manufacturers have recommendations on how long ropes should last but even they stress that ropes should be checked on an individual basis. Keeping a rope diary can help you to figure out when you should retire your rope.... (more)

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 31st 2015
Hi Emil, Usually you will find that thinner ropes have more capacity to stretch. During falls that are approaching factor 1 or above, this stretch can be very beneficial, putting less load on anchors and runners. However, if you have a competent belayer, and there is enough rope in the system, even the thickest ropes can still have enough stretch to allow for a comfortable fall. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 31st 2015
Hi Shannon, The Italian (or Munter) hitch is usually used in situations where the climber has dropped or forgotten their normal belay device. It works by forcing the rope to rub hard against itself, creating enough friction to hold a person. If you are using it frequently as your method of rappelling, then you may well find that your rope wears out more quickly than it would other wise. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 31st 2015
Hi Alex, There are specialized devices for cutting ropes (http://www.amazon.com/Seachoice-79901-ELECTRIC-ROPE-CUTTING/dp/B005150RE8) but this is probably too much of an investment for your one off situation. Don't worry! The alternative will only cost you one sharp knife (preferably a serrated one). Before you start, you should prepare some method of clamping the knife. Hold the knife over a hot flame until it is white hot; don't skimp on the heat, the more you can melt through your rope the better the final result.... (more)

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 31st 2015
Hi Fin, It is normal when buying a static rope to be given some indication of its elongation under a given load. Mammut for example list an "impact force" on their static ropes. However, no such rating is given for the rappel cord suggesting that it is more dynamic than their fully static ropes. The rope has been woven with polyester to increase it's stiffness, however it has also been left with some stretch in order to help with rappelling.... (more)

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