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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 25th 2015
Hi Alex, It certainly is. The Rhino was in fact made to prevent exactly the situation you describe. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 25th 2015
Hi Mikhael, If there is ever a connection that is your only lifeline, i.e when you are rappelling on an Italian hitch, you should use a locking carabiner. This could be a screwgate, magnetron, twistlock or even a twin-gate but not a snapgate. Personally, I would recommend using a large HMS carabiner with an Italian hitch. This makes it easier to see if yo have tied it correctly and also makes the rope easier to manage. Any locking carabiner would technically be safe though. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 25th 2015
Hi Todd, Having guide mode on your belay device can be really useful. However, many of these advantages may be lost on someone who is just getting into climbing. The main use of guide mode is to help you bring up a second. You will only find yourself in this situation if you are leading trad routes or leading multi-pitch sport routes.... (more)

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 25th 2015
Hi Shayne, Firstly, don't panic! There are various ways of using Carabiners to make a safe and usable belay or rappel device. The best and most simple is undoubtedly an Italian (or munter) hitch. Here is a helpful animation on how to tie this knot: http://howset.com/animated_show/how-to-make-italian-hitch/#.VdxWDPlViko If you are intending to finish your climb then it is best for the leader to be belayed on the remaining belay device and the second to be brought up using the Italian hitch.... (more)

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 25th 2015
Hi Alistair, There are a few techniques you can use to do this but you will only be able to descend half the length of your rope. The easiest method is to feed one end of your rope through the anchor and tie into it. then attach the Grigri to the rope on the other side of the anchor. Now you can weight the rope. When you pull the leaver on the Grigri the rope will feed through the anchor and you should descend.... (more)

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 25th 2015
Hi Tómas, The weight reduction is probably the main reason you would want to buy a thinner rope. On long, hard sport routes or on alpine routes, a lighter rope can be a huge advantage. There is no significant reduction of strength although a thinner rope probably won't be rated to as many falls. The only other advantage we can think of is the extra suppleness of a thinner ropes, meaning they might be easier to tie knots in. Hope that helps, Dave

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Dave Thexton's picture
Climbing Gear Geek
Aug 25th 2015
Hi Laurelle, As with all climbing equipment, if used incorrectly, it may get damaged. The sharp teeth of the tibloc have been known to shred the sheath of a rope but if you take a small moment to ensure that the tibloc is gripping the rope properly then this is very unlikely to happen. A new version of the tibloc is set to be released next year and this generation of the device is spring loaded to ensure that the rope will always be properly gripped. Hope that helps, Dave

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Silas Russell's picture
Aug 25th 2015
Hey Panu, It's probably no substitute for buying a properly dry treated rope but here is a product from nik wax: http://www.nikwax.com/en-gb/products/productdetail.php?productid=22

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