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Wild Country New Friend
61.49 € 80.00 €
DMM Wallnut Set 1-11
94.50 € 119.00 €
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Building Your Trad Climbing Rack | Climbing Daily Ep.861

Building Your Trad Climbing Rack | Climbing Daily Ep.861

Date
27th January 2017
27th Jan 2017
Comments
15
On this week’s Friday Gear Show, Matt was unleashed on the EpicTV Shop’s big wall of shiny gear to pick some items that you might need for your trad rack. There is a vast array of gear out there designed to fit into every size crack or hole, but we are focusing on the first few items you need. Remember to comment below with your trad rack set up for you're chance to win a Wild Country Friend. If you want to check out the gear in the video, click the links below: https://shop.epictv.com/en/category/nuts, http://bit.ly/2jExoeb, https://shop.epictv.com/en/category/slings, https://shop.epictv.com/en/category/quickdraws, https://shop.epictv.com/en/category/nut-keys. To watch the full videos of the Climbing Daily mash up, click here. Building Your Trad Climbing Rack | Climbing Daily Ep.861

Comments (15)

7 voters think this video is Handy
tomwright1234's picture
Awesome video for first time buyer of all things traddy! If you are planning on going anywhere other than the peak district get a set of DMM alloy offsets they will literally fit anywhere, they weigh pretty much nothing and are cheap (comparing to the rest of the rack). They dont work as well in the grit as other rock types. Best tip for starting out (after you get the basics) is to get loads of low level experience placing gear on lead and second harder pitches then maybe repeat the harder pitches when you've got confidence up and gear placing down!
28th Jan 2017
olie_234's picture
I started with size 1,2 & 3 friends, a set of DMM nuts and 10 draws. I split my draws between DMM alpha trad and wild country wild wire and only ever really used the alphas.... they are noticeably lighter and feel nicer in use too. I would also suggest going for the longest length draws you can get... less rope drag and the extra length really isn't getting you closer to the ground. One big thing I learnt is that when seconding, it's often really easy to make a piece of stuck gear even worse... climb up above the piece, weight the rope, have a good look at the placement and work out the best way to remove it. This applies to cams, nuts & hexes! (The DMM nut buster is great because the rubberised handle lets you bash it to remove stubborn gear).
27th Jan 2017
polivmi1's picture
It's important to find out which gear one should need for a route. Personally I prefer to use nuts and slings where possible and really trust friends only in deeper cracks. I always got by with some cheap friends and 1 C4 in size 2, which is kind of special and I am always saving it, because it has much wider range o movement than the others. Any set will do, just make sure once you place it, the placement should be good and your first one should withstand pull from the belayer if the rope stretches. When back at home on sandstone we are not allowed to use any metal protection (the rock is really soft) and we have to use just knots (eights, normal knots, monkey heads), which work as knuts and special synthetic friends called "UFO": Take a look on the pictures on these pages to see how these knots can be used: http://www.horyinfo.cz/view.php?cisloclanku=2010030031 and for UFOs http://www.lezec.cz/clanky.php?key=10923
27th Jan 2017
clsmit39's picture
Great video for those interested in building their first trad rack! It's an exciting time being alone on the wall for your first time while placing your own gear to protect yourself. It's also totally metal... I use the ultra light Black Diamond C4 cams primarily, mostly because I'm fat and I appreciate the extra weight taken off my harness. Don't be scared, Matt. If those puppies will hold me taking a 15 foot whipper, it'll take you. I also use the DMM nuts, which are great! If you want to be super duper fancy, get some hexes (AKA Cow Bells). These things will clink and clang all the way up the route, making everybody below look up and witness your epic send. Great for those who need that constant admiration from others to fulfill their sense of accomplishment. That, or people will just think your obnoxious. Lastly, if you want to start trad climbing, do yourself a favor and climb with somebody who also has a single rack. If one rack is good, two is better. (cue inappropriate joke, and proverbial high fives amongst bros). Have fun, and be safe. Also, send me food (I spent all my money on climbing gear). On second thought, send me more climbing gear.
27th Jan 2017
Benne de Bakker's picture
I started trad climbing about a year ago and the best tip I got from an experienced trad climber is to not rush your placement! Don't immediately start grabbing gear from your harness as soon as you see a potential placement. Instead take an extra 5 seconds to really take a good look at the size and shape of the crack and then continue to pick the right size cam/nut/hex from your harness. These 5 extra seconds for taking a good look, will save you from having to try 3 different cam sizes and so will save you time in the long rong. Taking a bit extra time can be really difficult when you are holding on to some tiny hold, but it's definitely worth it. Another tip or quote I got from a guide from Austria is 'Man sucht nicht, man findet'. This means something like, don't look for a placement, but find one. When trad climbing there is no rule, that you have to place a cam every 2 meters, like there are bolts in a sportclimbing route. Instead climb your route and place something when you come across a good crack, rock spike, hourglass etc. If this means 2 placements in 2 meters and then 3 meters nothing that's oké. If you keep this in mind, it will allow you to climb a lot quicker and not to worry too much about how far you have climbed since your last placement. But most of all, have fun!
27th Jan 2017

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